Voters prepare to vote on propositions: 1, 6, 7 and 10 in California 2018 election.

Barbara Prevost-Nedd, Staff Writer/Social Media Editor

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Voters in California can cause government to serve their interest and cater to their values in the general election on Nov. 6 – but that will not happen – unless eligible voters make the time to vote.

 

The upcoming election is the opportunity to tell government your preference on key issues:  Whether to borrow for affordable housing – Proposition 1; eliminate gas tax – Proposition 6; change daylight saving times – Proposition 7; and whether to implement rent control – Proposition 10.   Making educated and informed decisions about these issues is easy, using the voters guide.

 

San Diego Mesa student Zainab Alatawa, 18, Psychology major, looks forward to voting.  “I think this is a critical time for us to exercise our rights to vote,”  she said.

 

“It doesn’t matter really, if you are a Democrat or Republican, liberal or conservative.  When it comes to being human, you have to realize there are rights that are being violated.  People’s lives are being affected .  Nov. 6, is the time to do something about it,”  Alatawa continued.

 

Proposition 1, put on the ballot by the Legislatures, will allow the government to issue bonds (take out loans) in the amount of $4 billion, to pay for low income housing for residents, such as veterans and farmworkers.

 

This bond, if it passes, will increase cost to the state by an average of $170 Million each year, for the next 35 years.

 

A YES vote on Proposition 1, gives the government the go-ahead, to sell $4 billion in general obligation bonds to pay for affordable housing, while a NO vote on this measure, means the government is not given the go-ahead to sell $4 billion bonds to pay for veterans and affordable housing.

 

Supporters of this measure argue in part, that Prop 1 will pay for affordable housing for many, including veterans, working families and seniors.   But opponents argue, that the housing shortage crisis would require a far bigger solution than the passing of this bond.

 

Proposition 6, called the gas tax, was put on the ballot by petition signatures and asks the voter to determine whether to repeal a 2017 transportation law’s taxes and fees which are currently designated for road repairs and public transportation.

 

If this measure passes, current revenues from fuel and vehicle taxes which the government uses to pay for highway and road maintenance as well as transit programs, will be reduced by $5.1 billion.

 

A YES vote on this measure would eliminate fuel and vehicle taxes which were recently passed by the Legislature, while a NO vote would allow the government to continue to collect vehicle and fuel taxes to pay for highways and road maintenance and repairs as well as transit programs.

 

Arguments in favor of this measure say Prop 6 gets rid of unfair regressive gas and car taxes, while those against this measure say that it jeopardizes the safety of bridges and roads.

 

Proposition 7, prepared by the attorney general, would have no impact on the budget, and allow the Legislature to change daylight saving time period using a two-third vote.  This measure was put on the ballot by the Legislature.

 

A YES vote on this measure would allow the Legislature to change daylight saving time, using a two-third majority, as long as the changes are consistent with federal law.  On the other hand, a NO vote would mean that California would maintain its current daylight saving time period.

 

Those in favor of Prop 7 say that medical researchers and economists agree that the time change is hazardous to the health and productivity of school children and seniors.  But those against this measure say that children would be going to school in the dark, if this measure passes.

 

Proposition 10, put on the ballot by petition signatures, would expand the government’s authority to enact rent control on residential property.

 

A YES vote on this measure would mean that State law would not limit rent control laws  cities and counties could have and a NO vote, would maintain the status quo, state law would continue to limit the kinds of rent control laws cities and counties could have.

 

Arguments in favor of this measure this measure keeps tenants in their homes, not pushed far away or into homelessness.  Those who are against this measure say that Prop 10 would make the housing crisis worse, not better.

2018 MIDTERM ELECTION PROPOSITIONS

Official Voter Information Guide | California Secretary of State

1 YES Allows the state to sell $4 billion in general obligation bonds to fund veterans  and affordable housing.
NO The state could not sell $4 billion in general obligation bonds to fund   veterans and affordable housing.
6 YES Eliminate fuel and vehicle taxes which would reduce funding for highway and road maintenance and repairs, and transit program.
NO Fuel and vehicle taxes would continue to be in effect and pay for highway and road maintenance and repairs, and transit programs.
7 YES The legislature, with two third vote, could change daylight saving time if change is allowed by federal government.
NO California would maintain its current daylight saving time period.
10 YES State law would not limit the kinds of rent control laws cities and counties could have.
State law would continue to limit the kinds of rent control laws cities and counties could have.

 

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Barbara Prevost-Nedd, Social Media Editor/Staff Writer

I have had a long held interest in writing but detoured to the field of Accounting, in which I earned a degree at CSU San Marcos. I am happy for this opportunity...

Voters prepare to vote on propositions: 1, 6, 7 and 10 in California 2018 election.