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Review: Randy’s Donuts

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A sprinkles donut at Randy’s Donuts in Stonecrest Plaza.

You’ll rarely watch a show or film based in Los Angeles without seeing a shot of the iconic, giant donut sitting atop Randy’s Donuts in Inglewood. Now, San Diego boasts its own Randy’s, and though the architectural donut didn’t make the cut, the scrumptious quality they are known for definitely did. 

Located along Murphy Canyon road in Stonecrest Plaza, the location itself is unassuming. Without preconception of its fame, it would be easy to shrug it off as just another donut joint. However, the lines and sold out signs before closing assure it to be more than your average donut spot. 

The business has been incessantly popular since their recent grand opening on May 3 and experience their highest volume on weekends. They were sold out by 5:53p.m. last Friday and had a line out the door at 10a.m. on Sunday. On Monday around noon, however, there was no line, though there was hardly a moment where they didn’t have a customer, or a few, walk through the door. 

The space is decorated with iconic shots of Randy’s donuts around the U.S. One of their walls has a mixed medium shot of their Inglewood location, with a giant 3D donut protruding from the wall. 

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Alternative R&B played in the background as friendly faces greeted customers with an enthusiastic “Hi, welcome to Randy’s!” Their ample donut selection can feel overwhelming, so consider checking out the menu ahead of time to help narrow down options. 

Customers have a variety of options to ensure they take home a quantity and mix of donuts they are content with. You can order individual donuts, or take home dozens. They classify their donuts into four major categories: classic, deluxe, fancy, and premium. The complexity of donuts increases as they move up their classification system, and they offer four different dozen options to ensure you leave with a mix you are satisfied with. 

A classic dozen came out to be $27.84, with a 20 percent gratuity included because service was friendly and enthusiastic. The staff members maintained a friendly disposition despite being asked the same questions by first time customers.

Considering a classic donut has a traditional baseline flavor, the donut reviewed was their version of a classic. The serving size was generous. For reference, it was about twice as big and significantly more fluffy than Krispy Kreme’s classic donut. Upon first bite, the donut was pillowy, with dough that melted like thick cotton candy. Each bite was accentuated by a light sweetness, though it did eventually compound. Just one donut will leave you feeling satiated. 

Overall, the experience was 9/10. The establishment was clean, service was friendly, and the product was delicious. The subtracted point is coming from the donut being a bit too rich overall, though richness is expected from most donuts. Though a visit to Inglewood’s iconic Randy’s Donuts is definitely worth crossing off your bucket list, save yourself the trip and visit Randy’s here in San Diego!

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About the Contributor
Keila Menjivar
Keila Menjivar, Staff Writer
Keila Menjivar is a staff writer for the Mesa Press. Though not a first year college student, this is her first year at Mesa College, where she recently changed her major to Journalism. She plans to transfer to SDSU where she will continue her studies in Journalism. Keila is especially passionate about equal access to wellness and is a part of the growing movement that aims to elevate quality of life for historically marginalized groups who currently experience socioeconomic and emotional barriers to accessing personal fulfillment. When her nose isn’t buried in a book, you can find Keila at the beach, gym, or her local yoga studio.
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