Local propositions, measures to be voted on

Kyla Brown, Staff Writer

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San Diego County voters are about to make many decisions on local measures that affect them at home. Many local propositions focus on the county’s schools, while others concern term limits, beautification projects and the regulation of marijuana dispensaries.  Information for three of the San Diego County 2012 ballot measures are listed below.

Prop Z:
San Diego Neighborhood Schools Classroom Safety and Repair

Proposition Z would authorize the San Diego Unified School District, or SDUSD, to issue and sell $2.8 billion of general obligation bonds in order to provide funds to repair neighborhood schools and charter schools. In order to repay the bond holders with legal interest rates, property taxes within the SDUSD would go up approximately $60 for every $100,000 in property value. This is in addition to Proposition S which passed in 2008 that sold $2.1 billion worth of bonds to repair schools and upgrade technology.

If Passed:

With a 55 percent supermajority vote, the funds would be used to repair and renovate local schools. Major electrical, plumbing, and infrastructure repair work would be completed including asbestos and mold removal. New classrooms would be built and renovated, laboratories would be updated, and modern safety and handicap equipment implemented. Bond funds cannot be used for teachers or administrators salaries and an independent oversight committee would be required to make sure that taxpayer dollars were being spent correctly.

If not passed:

The SDUSD would not be authorized to sell $2.8 of general obligation bonds.  Prop S would stay in effect.

Source: San Diego Unified School District and County Counsel Impartial Analysis 

Measure J:
City of Del Mar Village Specific Plan

The Del Mar Village Specific Plan was approved by the Del Mar City Council in order to improve the appearance of the Del Mar Village. The plan includes new standards and regulations for construction and businesses, and aims to make the area along Camino del Mar between 9th Street and 17th Street pedestrian orientated.

If Passed: 

Camino del Mar would be designed to be a two lane road with roundabouts replacing stop signs at 9th, 11th, and 13th Streets. This would be similar to Bird Rock, allowing traffic to flow at a steadier rate.

Wider sidewalks and pedestrian plazas would be built, and new parking lots and structures would increase current parking availability by 60 percent. The plan could take up to 30 years to fully realize, and would be paid through grant funding and developer and regulatory fees, not through raising taxes.

If Not Passed:

Existing zoning laws would remain the same. Measure B, adopted in 1986, would continue to require voter approval for large commercial development in downtown Del Mar.

Sources: Executive Summary of Del Mar Village Specific Plan and City Attorney Impartial Analysis

Measure S:
City of Imperial Beach Medical Marijuana Dispensaries Act

Prop S seeks to repeal the current city ordinance which bans medical marijuana dispensaries ran by more than three people.

Dispensaries would not be allowed to be within 300 feet of another dispensary or 600 feet of a school and would be required to charge sales tax according to state law. Imperial Beach is one of four San Diego County cities with a measure on the ballot to legalize medical marijuana dispensaries.

If Passed: 

Medical marijuana dispensaries would be permitted in Imperial Beach. The dispensaries would have to be in compliance with the law meaning security cameras and alarms must be installed and they may only give marijuana to qualified patients and caregivers.

While no alcohol would be allowed, marijuana smoking would be permitted at the dispensary. Outdoor growing of marijuana would be allowed as long as it is not visible from outside the dispensary and it is kept completely secure.

If Not Passed: 

The city’s ban on medical marijuana dispensaries with more than three people would remain in effect.

Source: City Attorney’s Impartial Analysis 




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